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How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb

how-to-photograph-an-atomic-bomb-screenshot-5

Catchy title, huh?  That’s exactly what I thought when I saw a short review on the book by Peter Kuran titled, wait for it…. “How to Photograph an Atomic Bomb

To understand me, you must first know that I have a lot of free time, whether it be on planes or just sitting around the house, I try and spend at least a day each week reading about random hobbies/interests.  One such interest is nukes… go ahead and say it, “Blair has lost his damn mind.”

I promise I haven’t, but rather find them and how they were created thoroughly interesting.  Then I happened upon Mr. Kuran’s book and the world of nukes and photography collided, I was smitten.

Images such as this one captivated me:

Which brings me to my reason of this post…  I have only one piece of art on my walls where I edit (painting of Michael Schumacher), and need to spruce up the place.  When I saw this print of the men who built the bombs, lit by a nuclear bomb, I decided I must have it!

So with that said, if anyone can help me find where to order a print of this, I will get a print (of one of my photos) out to you…

6 Comments Post a comment
  1. Bill Sawalich #

    I love a good treasure hunt, but I haven’t been able to find anything conclusive on this shot yet.

    First I tried the Library of Congress photographic archive online, but to no avail. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/ (They do have other amazing atom bomb images, though.)
    Then I found the Brookings Institution has a page with caption information and attribution: http://www.brookings.edu/projects/archive/nucweapons/vip.aspx Unfortunately, this is simply attributed to the Defense Special Weapons Agency, and they don’t seem to exist any more. Or at least not in the photographic print sales business.

    Interestingly, the page is from another neat collection of nuclear images: http://www.brookings.edu/projects/archive/nucweapons/photos.aspx and the whole thing is part of a project that ultimately produced a book, if you really care to geek out on nuclear history: http://www.brookings.edu/press/Books/1998/atomic.aspx

    Lastly, I tried Getty. They have a great archive of historical images. My thinking was you could buy a file and make your own print. Alas, while they have other historic nuclear test photos, they don’t have this one. http://www.gettyimages.com/EditorialImages/Archival

    How about a quickly executed drawing in #2 pencil? Will that suffice?

    November 10, 2010
  2. Matthew Coughlin #

    Is this what you are looking for?

    http://store03.prostores.com/servlet/atomstore/the-71/Witness-to-An-Atomic/Detail

    That is a great photo.

    Matt

    November 16, 2010
  3. Kingsley #

    That’s an impressive effort Bill

    November 16, 2010
  4. Blair #

    Bill and Matt,
    Send me your addresses, you both did one heck of a job!

    BB

    November 22, 2010
  5. Hey Blair,

    First of all, just watched your ride along with the Thunderbirds! EPIC!! I am a photographer as well and have a fascination with atomic history. Just thought I would pass along a couple of books that will forever be with me. One must read is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Making_of_the_Atomic_Bomb
    And the next is a must have for its unbelievable visual awe
    http://www.michaellight.net/suns-intro/
    I hope you get the chance to check them out.
    Keep on kicking ass!!

    May 8, 2014
  6. Nice finds man! Ordered them both.

    Thank you so much for the recommendations!

    May 8, 2014

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